The making of the Stoloto quick games interface

Overview   Process  

Trying to build an interface from typical blocks already in use on the website.

Placing the lotteries on the preliminary layout grid.

Estimating the scroll behavior.

The client asks to move away from the classic representation of lotteries and similarity with paper tickets. Toning down the background and making vertical fields horizontal.

Thinking about the payment mechanism. Technical limitations prevent us from adding payment right on the game page. Generating a bunch of alternatives from popup windows to iframes.

Looking at the overall style.

Coming up with ticket purchase animation.

The client asks us to think about the auto betting mode. We turn to the traditional casino bets: half of all the numbers, all multiples of a number, all even or odd numbers, etc. The available set of buttons depends on the rules of the game.

Finalizing the project, discussing it with the client and sending for typesetting.

Creating the graphics in the style of the website keeping in mind that everything might change many times over.

Once the typeset mock-ups are ready, we realize the need for bug reports. Working on the small details and keeping the technologist busy.

Trying the purchased tickets view on the mock-up.

Working on the style of error messages.

The ticket checking mode evolves in small steps.

Live draw results view mutates rapidly.

Launching quick games in test mode. People start playing and submit first reviews. The feedback prompts the client to revert to the visual style of classic lotteries. Bringing back the grid and backgrounds that the players are accustomed to.

The new changes lead to more challenges for the layout. The new design is introduced right on the live website. Arranging with the technologist to make changes as soon as they are ready. Writing bug reports in the Business Lynch style: finding a bunch of problems, approaching the technologist and explaining them in our own words. Small problems are fixed right away while the bigger ones are put into todo lists.




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