Identity   Advertising  

Part 1   Part 2  

The making of the advertising campaign for the Year of Culture in Moscow. Part 2

Overview   Process  

We need to come up with more posters for the Year of Culture advertising campaign. Generating ideas. A Tajik handyman with Frida Kahlo’s face.

The client laughs, but rejects the idea. Coming up with a musical staff made of chicken wings on grill.

The art director asks to choose another composer to avoid associations with the fried Imperial Eagle and Russia’s anthem. The client likes the idea but suggests we replace the wings with something nicer. Using rack of lamb.

Adding sausages, adjusting the layout and cooking the lamb well.

The next idea is to have a poem written on a dirty car window.

The art director asks to replace the Mini with a Russian car.

The client comments that it is the year of Lermontov’s 200th birthday and asks to use one of his poems. Suggesting this one.

Client: Look at the license plate! I hope it was an honest mistake, I don’t even want to think that you made it on purpose. And besides, it starts to look as a “Keep Our City Clean” campaign. I can’t see any culture here.

Replacing the van with a white car and choosing a less provocative poem.

Generating more ideas, but all are a miss.

Deciding to put Nabokov’s Lolita on a windshield instead of the traditional Flirt magazine.

Per the client’s request replacing the book, this time choosing The Decameron.

Next up is a ballerina jumping over a puddle.

The client doesn’t like the puddle right in between the girl’s legs, so instead we ask the ballerina to change a light bulb.

Replacing the dress with a shirt and pants.

Coming up with a hair style in the shape of the Eiffel Tower.

Too banal. Deciding to go with the Shukhov Tower. Asking the make-up artist to create a hair tower around a mineral water bottle.

Taking photographs and retouching.

Rounding up with a picture of a child drawing on a wall.

Painting the picture.

Photographing and assembling the poster.




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