• Interfaces
  • Scala
  • What it is What we did Guidelines Icons Splash screens Project


    The results of our iScala interface design project are summarized in the document called iScala Visual Guidelines.

    It contains detailed descriptions of all interface components and layouts for each and every status, and about 200 charts and images accurate to the last pixel.

    The most difficult task was to correlate all interface element sizes with font size—it is necessary so that users who prefer large fonts wouldn’t have buttons, message boxes and scrollbars messed up. There are many reasons why people use large fonts like vision impairment, high resolution displays, etc.

    Created using such an approach, iScala interface is guaranteed against any distortions—even some future 65526×49152 resolution will not produce visually distructive effects.

    We provided the iScala software developers with precise descriptions of the elements they may need to further enhance iScala’s capabilities (buttons, headers, panels, scrollbars, menus, alerts, input fields, tables). For a standard appearance we chose the colors to agree with the current Windows color scheme.

    iScala’s special advantage is its multilanguage support. In some of the featured languages words run from right to left (Arabic, Hebrew), and some use hieroglyphs (Chinese).



    It required each element to be universal, i.e. independent from certain language peculiarities. It was not easy, but we managed to make the interface fully adjust to the current writing system (in case of right-to-left pattern, all the menus and bars originally from the left appear in the right part of the screen). Every pixel and every indent really matter in this respect.


    iScala’s original appearance was developed independently with no elements borrowed from a particular operating system.


    iScala Visual Guidelines represent standards that rule the interface, its components and layouts. These can be used to create new elements and combinations if needed.

    iScala 2.1 was developed under the code name Galapagos


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