Map 1.0
archived
Map 2.0
archived

 
Official maps:
   

Main   Pocket   Multilingual   Postcard  

1.0   2.0  

The making of the Moscow Metro pocket map 2.0

Overview   Packaging   Process  

Since the first version of the pocket map was published, the Moscow Metro map got through many changes and became bilingual. We start by creating an approximate layout and trying to print both the Russian and English maps with indexes.

Printing a test mock-up. It turns out, the sheet is now too large and difficult to handle, making it impossible to unfold the map in one move. Going back to the original layout. For the time being working on two versions of the map, a Russian-English one with a Russian index and an English-Russian one with an English index. Then discarding the English version altogether as there are doubts as to whether it will sell well. Assembling a mock-up. Including the information block from the car map.

Looking at the printouts. There is lots of free space around the map which means it can be enlarged more still, but the English text is too small and barely readable. It would also be great to find a better way to arrange the railway terminals and airports in the index (maybe by writing them in a separate column). Also, the art director asks to remove the Cast section.

Refreshing the covers. Putting the Moscow star in the center.

Done. The map is sent to the editors for proofreading and then to the press. At the same time, we are busy thinking about the covers and packaging. Using a map in the box design would be an obvious choice, we want to try something else first. Tourists often mark points of interest on maps, what if we add a variety of hand-written markings to the map?

The best thing about this map is that its incredibly compact. We can try to emphasize it.

Or maybe bright patterns?

The art director decides to go with the jeans. Taking photographs.

Cutting the jeans up.

Stitching them back together and coloring.

The jeans look a bit dirty. Asking the photographer to help. She takes them to the dry cleaner and returns absolutely pristine.

These new ones look better, no doubt. Printing a mock-up and checking out how the packaging would look on a shelf and in its different states.

The editor proofreads the text. Preparing the final drawing.

Done.




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